“The Authentic Snap? D.I.Y. Reporting in the Age of We Media”

Moschovi, Alexandra (2010) “The Authentic Snap? D.I.Y. Reporting in the Age of We Media”. In: Supplementary Conflicts: Domesticities and Life Histories in Wartime session, 36th AAH Annual Conference 2010, 15 - 17 April 2010, University of Glasgow, Scotland.

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Abstract

On the night of December 6th 2008, at the edges of Exarcheia Square in central Athens, Greece, a 15-year old student was shot dead by a police officer, following what turned out to be a not so casual Saturday night argle-bargle between a police patrol and a group of youths. Within hours of the incident, hundreds of enraged teenage and twenty-something youths would take to the streets of Athens and what would start as impromptu protests over the boy’s death would soon escalate into the worst rioting Greece has witnessed since the restoration of democracy in 1974.
Being digital natives and capitalizing on the micropublishing opportunities that Web 2.0 offers, the young rioters would use mobile-phone technology and social networking sites such as Facebook and MySpace to mobilize people at home and abroad and provide updates of the news-in-the-making by twittering and blogging, illustrated by a constant stream of “authentic” snaps.
This paper examined how photographs of riots and conflict taken by citizens may be circulated and recontextualised online as eye-witness documents affording alternative, allegedly more “democratic” reporting to mainstream news coverage. It also investigated how this personalization of the news may function as a participatory act in the making of collective history. Issues of authenticity and credibility, subjectiveness and sentimentality, crudeness and amateurisation as well as aesthetic considerations in the construction of meaning and ideology were central to the argument.

Item Type: Conference or Workshop Item (Paper)
Additional Information: Supplementary Conflicts: Domesticities and Life Histories in Wartime Session Convenors: Paul Fox, University College London and Gil Pasternak, University College London. Speakers: Antigoni Memou (University of East London) A Conflict of Representations: Photography and the Internet in the Zapatista Struggle; Jeannine Tang (Courtauld Institute of Art) Citizens Against Chauvinism: Martha Rosler’s Feminist Polemics; Stina Barchan (Independent) Dada in the Suburb: Hannah Höch and the Second World War; Chris Cornish (Slade School of Fine Art) ‘The Killbox’: Experiencing Architecture and Landscape in Digital Warfare; Peter Stilton (University of Bristol) Colin Self’s ‘Archaeology of Anxiety’; Ian Horton (University of the Arts, London) Wilhelm Sandberg’s ‘Experimenta Typographica’: Domestic Origins and Post-war Impact; Sharon Jordan (Independent) Painting in Arcadia: Ernst L. Kirchner and Male Friendship, 1914-1917.
Uncontrolled Keywords: Citizen journalism, digital photography, network communications, social networking media, Web 2.0, prosumer, multiperspectivalism, public mobilization, civic engagement, i-rioting
Subjects: Fine Art > Art History
Fine Art > Art in Context
Fine Art > Digital Media
Culture > History and Politics
Photography > Photography
Divisions:
Faculty of Arts Design and Media > Department of Arts and Design
Depositing User: Alexandra Moschovi
Date Deposited: 28 Feb 2012 11:51
Last Modified: 28 Feb 2012 11:51
URI: http://sure.sunderland.ac.uk/id/eprint/2762

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