Evaluation of the most intense high-intensity running periods in English FA Premier League soccer matches

Di Mascio, M and Bradley, Paul (2013) Evaluation of the most intense high-intensity running periods in English FA Premier League soccer matches. Journal of Strength & Conditioning Research, 27 (4). pp. 909-915. ISSN 1064-8011

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Abstract

The aim of this study was to examine the most intense period of high-intensity running during elite soccer matches. Elite players (n=100) were analysed using a multi-camera computerised tracking system. High-intensity running distance (speed >=19.8 km[middle dot]h-1) and that covered in the most intense 5-min period were quantified during matches. High-intensity running was performed for ~3% of total time but this doubled (F[1,99] = 9.179, p<0.001, d>1.2) during the most intense period (8.4+/-2.7 vs. 16.4+/-4.6 s). Recovery time between high-intensity efforts was ~30 s during the most intense period (33.3+/-19.7 s). The work:rest ratio between high-intensity bouts increased (F[1,99] = 2.018, p<0.001, d>0.6) from 1:12 for the match average to 1:2 during the most intense period. The distance of each discrete high-intensity running bout increased (F[1,99] = 1.958, p<0.001, d>0.6) ~13% during the most intense period compared to the match average (6.7+/-1.8 vs. 5.8+/-0.6 m). Central defenders were running at high-intensity for less (F[4,95] = 4.907, p<0.05, d>0.6) time than full-backs, wide midfielders and attackers (12.9+/-2.4 vs. 17.9+/-3.4, 18.3+/-5.5 and 16.9+/-3.8 s). Central defenders had a greater recovery time (F[4,95] = 3.083, p=0.023, d>0.6) between high-intensity efforts than wide midfielders. No differences were evident between playing positions for maximum running speed and average distances of high-intensity running. These results show that high-intensity running, work:rest ratios and average high-intensity distances increased during the most intense period of matches and is highly dependent on positional role. Therefore, conditioning drills and performance tests should closely mimic distances, work:rest ratios and recovery times of those found during intense periods.

Item Type: Article
Subjects: Sciences > Sport Sciences
Divisions: Faculty of Applied Sciences
Faculty of Applied Sciences > Department of Sport and Excercise Sciences
Health Sciences and Wellbeing Beacon
Health Sciences and Wellbeing Beacon > Health Improvement and Wellbeing Workstream
Depositing User: Glenda Young
Date Deposited: 01 Feb 2013 15:11
Last Modified: 04 Jul 2013 10:40
URI: http://sure.sunderland.ac.uk/id/eprint/3476

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