"Better Die Fighting for Justice Than to Die Like a Dog": African Americans and Guns, 1866-1941

Yuill, Kevin (2013) "Better Die Fighting for Justice Than to Die Like a Dog": African Americans and Guns, 1866-1941. In: A Cultural History of Firearms in the Age of Empire. Ashgate. ISBN 1409447529

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Abstract

This chapter looks at the interrelations between African-Americans and guns in the late nineteenth and early twentieth centuries, contrasting attitudes expressed today with those in the past. The most important factors in determining attitudes to firearms and African-Americans, the article finds, involved the perceived threat of an armed African-American populace, the perception of whether or not African-Americans were or could be equal citizens of the United States, and the practical need for African-Americans to defend themselves against white aggression. African-Americans and liberals concerned with black equality resisted attempts to control guns in the past.

Item Type: Book Section
Uncontrolled Keywords: firearms, race, guns, Second Amendment, African American history
Subjects: Culture > History and Politics
Divisions: Faculty of Education and Society > Department of Culture
Depositing User: Kevin Yuill
Date Deposited: 24 Mar 2016 09:03
Last Modified: 24 Mar 2016 09:03
URI: http://sure.sunderland.ac.uk/id/eprint/4096

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