Global insights into the clinical management of Type II Diabetes mellitus; a context specific view from Nigeria on drivers and barriers to clinical nursing management

Bosun-Arije, Stella Foluke, Hayes, Catherine, Ling, Jonathan and Graham, Yitka (2017) Global insights into the clinical management of Type II Diabetes mellitus; a context specific view from Nigeria on drivers and barriers to clinical nursing management. In: Diabetes UK Professional Conference 2017, 8 -10 Mar 2017, Manchester Central, Manchester.

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Abstract

Introduction: Key recommendations of the World Health Organisation (WHO) global strategy are cost-saving, feasible and dynamic approaches for the management of Type II Diabetes mellitus. Whilst the impacts of socio-economic and psychological factors on management of the condition are well evidenced, understanding of organisational factors in the context of primary care is equally pivotal yet relatively little researched. Considerations of the geo-political and cultural context of healthcare provision could potentially identify additional information towards Type II Diabetes mellitus management. Nurses are an integral part of the global health professional workforce, whose contribution to evidence-based practice, could potentially contribute to the modernisation of nursing care for people living with Type II Diabetes mellitus.
Aims: To understand and analyse nurses’ experiences on drivers of and barriers to evidence based Type II Diabetes mellitus management in Nigeria.
Methods: Using a Grounded Theory approach, semi-structured interviews were conducted with 17 nurses in Nigeria. Data sets were analysed using Interpretive Framework Analysis.
Results: Nurses do not perceive organisational factors to be standalone factors influencing the management of Type II Diabetes mellitus in hospital settings. However, novel and flexible approaches such as using of humour and anecdotes during counselling, patient networking, use of dosette boxes and involvement of social welfare services were highlighted as drivers of management. Barriers to management were identified as conflict between tribal languages, limited resources, cultural orientation, community knowledge, and information management.
Conclusions: Interpretive Thematic Analysis revealed strong drivers of and barriers to Type II Diabetes mellitus management, a critical indication for frequent organisational review of the structure and culture of care settings for people living with a diagnosis of Type II Diabetes mellitus.

Item Type: Conference or Workshop Item (Paper)
Subjects: Sciences > Nursing
Sciences
Divisions: Faculty of Applied Sciences > Department of Pharmacy Health and Wellbeing
Depositing User: Catherine Hayes
Date Deposited: 13 Jan 2017 08:52
Last Modified: 13 Jan 2017 08:52
URI: http://sure.sunderland.ac.uk/id/eprint/6871

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