The prevalence of Special Educational Needs and Disabilities (SEND) identified in young people, aged 3-16, across the City of Sunderland: University of Sunderland, School of Education

Martin-Denham, Sarah, Benstead, Helen and Donaghue, Jacob (2017) The prevalence of Special Educational Needs and Disabilities (SEND) identified in young people, aged 3-16, across the City of Sunderland: University of Sunderland, School of Education. University of Sunderland, School of Education.

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Abstract

This paper presents the findings of a mixed methods investigation into the prevalence of Special Educational Needs and/or Disabilities (SEND), identified in children and young people aged 3-16 years, across the City of Sunderland. This study was commissioned by Sunderland City Council, with the aim of informing their 5-year strategy for SEND provision. In providing a backdrop for this investigation, three inter-connected literature bases are explored; firstly, the demographics of the City of Sunderland and the current legislation surrounding SEND; secondly, the literature surrounding the specific primary need of Autism is analysed; and thirdly, literature highlighting alternative forms of education is presented and discussed. Analysis of data gathered through both qualitative and quantitative research methods has highlighted a range of foci for the Council, in formulating their 5-year SEND strategy. The data has indicated that there is a particularly high prevalence of children identified with Social, Emotional and Mental Health difficulties, as well as Autism and Moderate Learning Difficulties in Sunderland compared to national averages. Conversely, there is a lower than expected prevalence of children identified with Specific Learning Difficulties. The recommendations from this study focus on providing quality Continued Professional Development (CPD) opportunities in relation to meeting the varying needs of the SEND population, particularly for Special Educational Needs Co-ordinators (SENCos); clarifying the role of the Designated Medical Officer (DMO); exploring opportunities for data sharing and ensuring that developing opportunities for effective multi-agency working are a priority for the Council.

Item Type: Article
Subjects: Education > Primary Education
Education > Educational Research
Education > Secondary Education
Divisions: Faculty of Education and Society
Faculty of Education and Society > School of Education
Depositing User: Helen Benstead
Date Deposited: 11 Mar 2019 10:08
Last Modified: 15 Apr 2020 17:47
URI: http://sure.sunderland.ac.uk/id/eprint/10492

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