Disclosure and adverse effects of complementary and alternative medicine used by hospitalized patients in the North East of England

Bello, Nusirat, Winit -Watjana, Win, Baqir, wasim and McGarry, Kenneth (2012) Disclosure and adverse effects of complementary and alternative medicine used by hospitalized patients in the North East of England. Pharmacy Practice, 10 (3). pp. 125-135. ISSN 1886-3655

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Abstract

Objectives: This study aimed to investigate the prevalence, disclosure and adverse effects of complementary and alternative medicine (CAM) use in hospitalised patients, and to explore the associations between patients’ perceived side-effects and relevant factors.
Methods: Patients who were admitted to a district general hospital and met the eligibility criteria were interviewed using a semi-structured questionnaire. Their medications and pertinent details were verified from the medical notes. All quantitative and qualitative data were collated and analysed. A chi-squared test was performed to test the associations of the perceived CAM side-effects with the significance level determined at a=0.05.
Results: A total of 240 in-patients completed the study. They were mostly white British (98.8%). The prevalence of CAM use within two years was 74.6% and one month 37.9%. Only 19 of 91 patients (20.9%) using CAM within one month disclosed their current CAM applications. Nearly half of patients (45.8%) who used CAM within two years experienced various CAM side-effects that tended to resolve after discontinuation. Slightly more than half (57.6%) perceived CAM side-effects and their perceptions were significantly associated with gender (P=0.048) and consideration for future CAM use (P=0.033). Potential interactions between herbal remedies/dietary supplements and prescribed drugs, such as garlic with lisinopril or aspirin, were assessed in 82 patients (45.8%).
Conclusion: Most in-patients used CAM and experienced some adverse effects. The disclosure of CAM use and its adverse outcomes should be encouraged by healthcare professionals.

Item Type: Article
Subjects: Sciences > Pharmacy and Pharmacology
Divisions: Faculty of Applied Sciences
Faculty of Applied Sciences > Department of Pharmacy Health and Wellbeing
Health Sciences and Wellbeing Beacon
Health Sciences and Wellbeing Beacon > Health Improvement and Wellbeing Workstream
Depositing User: Glenda Young
Date Deposited: 08 Jan 2013 09:45
Last Modified: 12 Oct 2017 18:08
URI: http://sure.sunderland.ac.uk/id/eprint/3298

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