Testing an extended theory of planned behaviour to predict intention to participate in health-related exercise during long-distance flight travel

Leyland, Sandra, van Wersch, A and Woodhouse, D (2013) Testing an extended theory of planned behaviour to predict intention to participate in health-related exercise during long-distance flight travel. International Journal of Sport and Exercise Psychology. ISSN 1612-197X

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Abstract

Objectives: The purpose of this study was to examine intention to participate in exercise during long-haul flights using an extended theory of planned behaviour (TPB, Ajzen, 1991), augmented with the variables descriptive norm (DN) and self-identity (SI).

Design: The study employed a cross-sectional design using belief-based as well as direct quantitative questionnaire measures of all variables.

Method: Participants (N = 208), mean age 29.7 (SD = 11.50), were employees and students of three universities. Participants completed a questionnaire assessing the TPB predictors (attitude, subjective norm and perceived behavioural control) of intention to participate in in-flight exercise (walking and seated) and the additional variables DN and SI.

Results: Regression analysis showed that all variables significantly predicted intention to engage in walking and seated exercise using direct measures. A similar pattern of results was found using belief-based measures in the context of walking. Normative beliefs did not reach significance in the belief-based model of seated exercise. Based on direct measures, the TPB accounted for 50% of the variance in intention to walk and 41% to do seated exercise after controlling for past behaviour. The additional contribution of DN was 2% for walking and 1% for seated exercise. The additional contribution of SI was 2% for walking and 2% for seated exercise.

Conclusions: The results of this study support the application of TPB augmented with DN and SI in the context of walking and seated in-flight exercise. The findings can be used to aid the development of motivational strategies for health-related exercise during long-haul flight travel.

Item Type: Article
Subjects: Sciences > Sport Sciences
Divisions: Faculty of Applied Sciences
Faculty of Applied Sciences > Department of Sport and Excercise Sciences
Health Sciences and Wellbeing Beacon
Health Sciences and Wellbeing Beacon > Health Improvement and Wellbeing Workstream
Depositing User: Glenda Young
Date Deposited: 11 Jan 2013 08:59
Last Modified: 11 Jan 2013 08:59
URI: http://sure.sunderland.ac.uk/id/eprint/3318

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