Comparison of the outcome of kidney transplantation after pulsatile or continuous ex vivo hypothermic machine perfusion of kidneys donated after cardiac death: analysis of kidney pairs

Sevinc, Mustafa, Stamp, Susan, Ling, Jonathan, Carter, Noel, Talbot, David and Sheerin, Neil. S (2019) Comparison of the outcome of kidney transplantation after pulsatile or continuous ex vivo hypothermic machine perfusion of kidneys donated after cardiac death: analysis of kidney pairs. Transplantation Proceedings, 51 (6). pp. 1785-1790. ISSN 0041-1345

[img]
Preview
PDF
Sevinc et al TP 2019.pdf - Accepted Version
Available under License Creative Commons Attribution Non-commercial No Derivatives.

Download (101kB) | Preview

Search Google Scholar

Abstract

Background

Hypothermic machine perfusion is used to improve renal perfusion and reduce the rate of early and late graft dysfunction. It has been used in our unit since 2001. It has two modes of flow: continuous or pulsatile. The aim of this study is to compare the modes of perfusion in terms of perfusion-related parameters, graft survival and estimated glomerular filtration rate.

Methods

All donation after cardiac death kidneys between 2002 and 2014 were reviewed. Sixty-four pairs of kidneys were identified of which one kidney underwent pulsatile and the other continuous perfusion. Machine parameters including resistance and perfusion flow index levels at 0, 1, 2, 3, 4 hours were recorded and glutathione S-transferase measured in perfusate. Delayed graft function frequency, estimated glomerular filtration rate from the 1st week of transplantation until 5th year and graft survival rates were determined.

Results

Machine parameters were similar at all time points. Delayed graft function frequency, estimated glomerular filtration rates and graft survival were equivalent irrespective of perfusion mode.

Conclusion

Pulsatile perfusion may be regarded as more physiological. However, we could not identify differences in short or long term outcomes following transplantation of kidneys from the same donor that had been perfused under pulsatile or continuous conditions.

Item Type: Article
Subjects: Sciences > Biomedical Sciences
Sciences
Divisions: Faculty of Health Sciences and Wellbeing
Faculty of Health Sciences and Wellbeing > FHSW Executive
Faculty of Health Sciences and Wellbeing > School of Nursing and Health Sciences
Depositing User: Jonathan Ling
Date Deposited: 26 Mar 2019 11:24
Last Modified: 13 Mar 2020 03:38
URI: http://sure.sunderland.ac.uk/id/eprint/10545
ORCID for Jonathan Ling: ORCID iD orcid.org/0000-0003-2932-4474

Actions (login required)

View Item View Item

Downloads

Downloads per month over past year