Timing of urinary catheter removal after surgery: Identification of factors of importance to patients using a qualitative approach

Bhardwaj-Gosling, Rashmi, Brittai, Katie and Pickard, R (2011) Timing of urinary catheter removal after surgery: Identification of factors of importance to patients using a qualitative approach. In: Royal College of Nursing International Nursing Research Conference 2011, 16-18 May, 2011, Harrogate, UK.

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Abstract

Background:
Catheter-associated urinary tract infection (CAUTI)
is a key focus of patient safety initiatives [1].
Duration of catheterisation is a major risk factor
for CAUTI with bacteriuria increasing by 5% daily,
but early catheter removal is hampered by clinician
and patient factors [2]. Identification of these
barriers may help reduce CAUTI risk.
Aim:
To explore patients’ beliefs and perceptions
regarding short term catheterisation.
Methods:
Semi-structured recorded interviews were carried
out in November 2010 with three men and seven
women, aged 25 – 75 years, catheterised following
elective neurosurgery. Interviews were transcribed
and thematically analysed using grounded theory
approach.
Results:
The main themes were:
• Uncertainty: Lack of information; ‘I spent the
night worried sick thinking that I had to go back
to theatre to get my catheter removed’
• Consent: Not being told of the need for catheterisation; ‘It should definitely be written and on the
consent form because it’s your personal parts. I
was very upset waking up with one
• Dignity: ‘I suppose what I usually don’t like to
talk about is seeing the urine. I think that’s quite
undignified. Not having a catheter may also be
detrimental; ‘I wasn’t so embarrassed about the
catheter because I’d rather have that than keep
weeing the bed your dignity is taken away from
you
• Environment: Participants preferred to have the
catheter left in rather than having to ask the staff
to take them to the toilet.
Discussions:
Participant’s fears predominantly arose from
lack of knowledge. This should be modified by
provision of an information leaflet and pre-operative discussion. Embarrassment related to lack of
concealment of drainage bags and shared toilet
facilities which could be addressed by appropriate
equipment and individual en-suite patient rooms.
Recommended reading:
Department of Health (2009) High Impact Actions
for Nursing and Midwifery
l-Weise, BS. Van den Broek, PJ. (2005). Urinary
catheter policies for short-term bladder drainage
in adults. Cochrane Database of Systematic
Reviews Issue 3. Art. No.: CD004203.
Funding:
UK – Research Council
10,001 – 50,000

Item Type: Conference or Workshop Item (Paper)
Divisions: Faculty of Health Sciences and Wellbeing > School of Nursing and Health Sciences
Related URLs:
Depositing User: Leah Maughan
Date Deposited: 23 Jun 2020 14:49
Last Modified: 23 Jun 2020 14:49
URI: http://sure.sunderland.ac.uk/id/eprint/12167
ORCID for Rashmi Bhardwaj-Gosling: ORCID iD orcid.org/0000-0002-1895-9899

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