How to manage low testosterone level in men: a guide for primary care.

Al-Sharefi, Ahmed, Wilkes, Scott, Jayasena, Channa N and Quinton, Richard (2020) How to manage low testosterone level in men: a guide for primary care. The British journal of general practice : the journal of the Royal College of General Practitioners, 70 (696). pp. 364-365. ISSN 1478-5242

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Abstract

Male hypogonadism is a clinical syndrome characterised by testosterone deficiency and impaired spermatogenesis; due either to diseases of the hypothalamus or pituitary gland, or of the testes themselves.1 The diagnosis requires the presence of clinical features consistent with lack of testosterone plus the finding of persistent and unequivocally low serum testosterone levels. Failure to recognise and treat men with hypogonadism may predispose them to long-term health problems, such as anaemia, osteoporosis, depression, or sexual dysfunction.

Over recent years, there has been a surge in testosterone prescriptions for men with sexual dysfunction or putative age-related decline in testosterone,2 possibly reflecting pharmaceutical promotion, or sharing of misleading information on the internet. With growing demands and expectations of men worried about their wellbeing, there is a real risk of overdiagnosis and unnecessary treatment with testosterone. Suboptimal sampling conditions can lead to misinterpretation of serum biochemistry, and the long-term risks of testosterone therapy for men not having verified hypogonadism may be underestimated by ‘enthusiasts’.

Item Type: Article
Additional Information: ** From PubMed via Jisc Publications Router ** History: received 07-10-2019; accepted 14-11-2019.
Divisions: Faculty of Health Sciences and Wellbeing > School of Medicine
SWORD Depositor: Publication Router
Depositing User: Publication Router
Date Deposited: 14 Jul 2020 13:56
Last Modified: 04 Sep 2020 14:08
URI: http://sure.sunderland.ac.uk/id/eprint/12201
ORCID for Scott Wilkes: ORCID iD orcid.org/0000-0003-2949-7711

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