Performance and image enhancing drugs use in active military personnel and veterans: A contemporary systematic review.

Whyte, Ian, Leyland, Sandra and Ling, Jonathan (2020) Performance and image enhancing drugs use in active military personnel and veterans: A contemporary systematic review. Translational Sports Medicine. ISSN 2573-8488

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Abstract

Objective: The use of performance and image enhancing drugs (PIEDS) among active military personnel and veterans presents a public health concern. Deeper understanding of PIEDS use in those populations is necessary to understand what underpins their use and provide information to help shape interventions with the aim of reducing impacts on individuals’ health, wellbeing, social circumstances, public perception and, in serving personnel, any wider military performance.
Design and data sources: A contemporary review was conducted using five academic journal databases, citation searching and hand searching.
Eligibility criteria for selecting studies: Studies were excluded if published prior to 2000 or did not specify PIEDS use.
Results: Following this search, 20 studies were identified for review. Findings suggest that anabolic steroids and weight-loss supplements were the most used PIEDS. Image enhancement was mentioned the most as a reason for PIEDS use followed by keeping up with the physical and emotional demands of active duty. Additionally, findings suggested that young, male non-commissioned Army personnel were most likely to use PIEDS.
Conclusion: There were clear gaps in the current literature surrounding PIEDS use, as well as an understanding of when service personnel began using PIEDS. Further research should aim to answer these questions.

Item Type: Article
Subjects: Social Sciences
Divisions: Faculty of Health Sciences and Wellbeing
Depositing User: Jonathan Ling
Date Deposited: 22 Jul 2020 08:45
Last Modified: 03 Aug 2020 15:27
URI: http://sure.sunderland.ac.uk/id/eprint/12270
ORCID for Ian Whyte: ORCID iD orcid.org/0000-0001-9834-8926
ORCID for Sandra Leyland: ORCID iD orcid.org/0000-0002-3998-0670
ORCID for Jonathan Ling: ORCID iD orcid.org/0000-0003-2932-4474

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