Providing recommendations for a workplace-initiated intervention to reduce alcohol use in retirement: views of older drinkers and occupational health professionals

Armstrong-Moore, Roxanne (2019) Providing recommendations for a workplace-initiated intervention to reduce alcohol use in retirement: views of older drinkers and occupational health professionals. Doctoral thesis, University of Sunderland.

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Abstract

Introduction and Aims
The frequency and consumption of alcohol by older people is an increasing public health concern and literature suggests that retirement may influence this. The aims of this thesis were to explore alcohol use across retirement and to determine if and how an intervention could be implemented upon retiring to reduce the frequency of alcohol consumption.
Design and Methods
The thesis comprised three studies in order to fully answer my research questions. Study 1 was a systematic review of interventions to reduce alcohol use in later life. Study 1 informed the interview guides for Studies 2 and 3, which used semi-structured interviews with 17 individuals who were five years pre/post retirement (Study 2) and 10 individuals working in human Resources/Occupational Health (Study 3) to gain perspectives of alcohol use in retirement and recommendations for an intervention. Data were analysed using a Framework approach, with emergent themes being established throughout analysis.
Results
Study 1 consisted of a review of seven papers, examining the success of interventions aimed at older adults and found that there was varying success, and that interventions often lacked detail to establish exactly what worked and for whom. Results from Study 2 suggested that an intervention would be acceptable and should focus holistically on retirement; not solely on alcohol. Individuals also felt that delivering an intervention by smartphone or a computer application would be appropriate, providing there was some face-to-face support. Human Resources interviewees in Study 3 were open to an intervention and felt that incorporating more support for employees was their responsibility, but not their obligation.
Conclusions
This thesis presents novel findings related to alcohol use in retirement and has the potential to inform a future intervention that could be implemented in the workplace prior to retirement.

Item Type: Thesis (Doctoral)
Divisions: Collections > Theses
Depositing User: Leah Maughan
Date Deposited: 26 Oct 2020 11:59
Last Modified: 26 Oct 2020 12:05
URI: http://sure.sunderland.ac.uk/id/eprint/12738

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