Algorithm that delivers an individualized rapid-acting insulin dose after morning resistance exercise counters post-exercise hyperglycaemia in people with Type 1 diabetes.

Turner, D, Luzio, S, Gray, B J, Bain, S C, Hanley, S, Richards, A, Rhydderch, D C, Martin, R, Campbell, Matthew, Kilduff, L P, West, D J and Bracken, R M (2016) Algorithm that delivers an individualized rapid-acting insulin dose after morning resistance exercise counters post-exercise hyperglycaemia in people with Type 1 diabetes. Diabetic medicine : a journal of the British Diabetic Association, 33 (4). pp. 506-10. ISSN 1464-5491

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Abstract

AIMS

To develop an algorithm that delivers an individualized dose of rapid-acting insulin after morning resistance exercise to counter post-exercise hyperglycaemia in individuals with Type 1 diabetes.

METHODS

Eight people with Type 1 diabetes, aged 34 ± 7 years with HbA1c concentrations 72 ± 12 mmol/mol (8.7 ± 1.1%), attended our laboratory on two separate mornings after fasting, having taken their usual basal insulin the previous evening. These people performed a resistance exercise session comprising six exercises for two sets of 10 repetitions at 60% of the maximum amount of force that was generated in one maximal contraction (60% 1RM). In a randomized and counterbalanced order, the participants were administered an individualized dose of rapid-acting insulin (2 ± 1 units, range 0-4 units) immediately after resistance exercise (insulin session) by means of an algorithm or were not administered this (no-insulin session). Venous blood glucose concentrations were measured for 125 min after resistance exercise. Data (mean ± sem values) were analysed using anova (P ≤ 0.05).

RESULTS

Participants had immediate post-resistance exercise hyperglycaemia (insulin session 13.0 ± 1.6 vs. no-insulin session 12.7 ± 1.5 mmol/l; P = 0.834). The decline in blood glucose concentration between peak and 125 min after exercise was greater in the insulin exercise session than in the no-insulin session (3.3 ± 1.0 vs. 1.3 ± 0.4 mmol/l: P = 0.015). There were no episodes of hypoglycaemia (blood glucose <3.9 mmol/l).

CONCLUSIONS

Administration of rapid-acting insulin according to an individualized algorithm reduced the hyperglycaemia associated with morning resistance exercise without causing hypoglycaemia in the 2 h post-exercise period in people with Type 1 diabetes.

Item Type: Article
Divisions: Faculty of Health Sciences and Wellbeing > School of Nursing and Health Sciences
Depositing User: Leah Maughan
Date Deposited: 29 Jan 2021 14:04
Last Modified: 29 Jan 2021 14:04
URI: http://sure.sunderland.ac.uk/id/eprint/13039
ORCID for Matthew Campbell: ORCID iD orcid.org/0000-0001-5883-5041

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