Letting Down Rapunzel: feminism's effects of fairy tales.

Smith, Angela (2014) Letting Down Rapunzel: feminism's effects of fairy tales. Children's Literature in Education, 46 (4). pp. 424-437. ISSN 0045-6713

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Abstract

The importance of stories written for young readers is undisputed, and in particular the central place of the fairy story in popular culture is clearly recognized.
Whilst most of these stories are centuries old, they have been adapted by the cultures of the tellers to be more compatible with the ideological views of the audience. This article will explore how feminism has influenced two versions of the same story, published by the same publisher for comparable age groups through an exploration of the Ladybird versions of Rapunzel as published in 1968 and 1993. It will show how there are subtle changes in the text which do not affect the overall narrative structure but can offer an insight into the ways in which society has
ideologically positioned men and women. Fairclough’s critical discourse analysis (CDA) will be used to show how a close linguistic analysis of the text can reveal the
impact of feminism on the adaptation of children’s books.

Item Type: Article
Subjects: Culture > English Language and Literature
Divisions: Culture and Regional Studies Beacon
Faculty of Education and Society
Faculty of Education and Society > Department of Culture
Depositing User: Angela Smith
Date Deposited: 16 Dec 2014 14:53
Last Modified: 20 Sep 2017 00:57
URI: http://sure.sunderland.ac.uk/id/eprint/5209

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