Glass: A Material Practice in the Anthropocene

Panneels, Inge (2019) Glass: A Material Practice in the Anthropocene. Arts, 8 (1).

[img]
Preview
PDF
Arts _ Free Full-Text _ Glass—A Material Practice in the Anthropocene _ HTML.pdf - Submitted Version

Download (815kB) | Preview
[img]
Preview
PDF
10275.pdf - Published Version
Available under License Creative Commons Attribution No Derivatives.

Download (892kB) | Preview

Search Google Scholar

Abstract

This paper details and discusses Material Journey
(2018), an art project by the author that was exhibited at the National Glass Centre in Sunderland (UK) from 9 June to 2 September 2018. This research project sought to interrogate the material impact of one art project made of glass by carefully considering the different stages of making—from design to production to the exhibition phase. The carbon footprint of an energy intensive material such as glass is often considered anathema to sustainable making practices in the field of applied arts. Whilst this paper makes the case that the material impact of individual art practices isnegligible in the global context of carbon footprints, it
nevertheless argues that the craft of ‘making’ has a critical role to play in the Anthropocene. Critically, this project is one of the first art projects in glass that critically examines the carbon footprint of a material practice. It is argued that this conversation is long overdue but makes the case that the tools for understanding and calculating the carbon footprint
of a material practice are currently lacking and need more development.
Keywords:
glass; making; crafts; applied arts;
Anthropocene; sustainability; carbon footprint

Item Type: Article
Subjects: Glass and Ceramics > Kiln Glass
Culture
Glass and Ceramics
Divisions: Faculty of Arts and Creative Industries
Depositing User: Inge Panneels
Date Deposited: 14 Jan 2019 11:09
Last Modified: 20 May 2019 11:48
URI: http://sure.sunderland.ac.uk/id/eprint/10275

Actions (login required)

View Item View Item

Downloads

Downloads per month over past year