Predictors of Psychosocial Outcome of Bipolar Disorder: data from the Stanley Foundation Bipolar Network

Bennet, Francis, Hodgetts, Sophie, Close, Andrew, Frye, Mark, Grunze, Heinz, Keck, Paul, Kupka, Ralph, McElroy, Susan, Nolen, Willem, Post, Robert, Scharer, Lars, Suppes, Trisha and Sharma, Aditya (2019) Predictors of Psychosocial Outcome of Bipolar Disorder: data from the Stanley Foundation Bipolar Network. International Journal of Bipolar Disorders. ISSN 2194-7511

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Abstract

Background:Impairments in psychosocial functioning have been demonstrated in 30–60% of adults with bipolar disorder (BD). However, the majority of studies investigating the effect of comorbid mental health disorders and age at onset outcomes in BD have focused on traditional outcome measures such as mood symptoms, mortality and treatment response. Therefore, this project aimed to investigate the impact of comorbid mental health disorders and age at onset on longitudinal psychosocial outcome in participants with BD.Method:Mixed effects modelling was conducted using data from the Stanley Foundation Bipolar Network. Baseline factors were entered into a model, with Global Assessment of Functioning (GAF) score as the longitudinal outcome measure. Relative model fits were calculated using Akaike’s Information Criterion.Results:No individual comorbidities predicted lower GAF scores, however an interaction effect was demonstrated between attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) and any anxiety disorder (t= 2.180, p= 0.030). Participants with BD I vs BD II (t= 2.023, p=0.044) and those in the lowest vs. highest income class (t= 2.266, p= 0.024) predicted lower GAF scores. Age at onset (t= 1.672, p=0.095) did not significantly predict GAF scores.Conclusions:This is the first study to demonstrate the negative psychosocial effects of comorbid anxiety disorders and ADHD in BD. This study adds to the growing database suggesting that comorbid mental health disorders are a significant factor hindering psychosocial recovery.

Item Type: Article
Subjects: Psychology > Psychology
Divisions: Faculty of Health Sciences and Wellbeing > School of Psychology
Depositing User: Sophie Hodgetts
Date Deposited: 04 Nov 2019 14:51
Last Modified: 29 Jan 2020 11:00
URI: http://sure.sunderland.ac.uk/id/eprint/11298

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