Can Cerebral Lateralisation Explain Heterogeneity in Language and Increased Non-right Handedness in Autism? A literature review.

Pearson, Amy and Hodgetts, Sophie (2020) Can Cerebral Lateralisation Explain Heterogeneity in Language and Increased Non-right Handedness in Autism? A literature review. Research in Developmental Disabilities, 105 (103738). ISSN 0891-4222

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Abstract

Background
Autism is characterised by phenotypic variability, particularly in the domains of language and handedness. However, the source of this heterogeneity is currently unclear.
Aims
To synthesise findings regarding the relationship between language, handedness, and cerebral lateralisation in autistic people and consider how future research should be conducted in order to progress our understanding of phenotypic variability.
Methods and Procedures
Following a literature search and selection process, 19 papers were included in this literature review. Studies using behavioural, structural, and functional measures of lateralisation are reviewed.
Outcomes and Results
The studies reviewed provided consistent evidence of differential cerebral lateralisation in autistic people, and this appears to be related to between-group differences in language. Evidence relating this to handedness was less consistent. Many of the studies did not include heterogeneous samples, and/or did not specify the language process they investigated.
Conclusions and Implications
This review suggests that further research is needed to fully understand the relationship between cerebral lateralisation and phenotypic variability within autism. It is crucial that future studies in this area include heterogeneous samples, specify the language process they are investigating, and consider taking developmental trajectories into account.

Item Type: Article
Subjects: Psychology > Cognitive Behaviour
Psychology > Neuropsychology
Psychology > Psychology
Divisions: Faculty of Health Sciences and Wellbeing > School of Psychology
Depositing User: Amy Pearson
Date Deposited: 29 Jul 2020 15:06
Last Modified: 29 Jul 2020 15:06
URI: http://sure.sunderland.ac.uk/id/eprint/12355
ORCID for Amy Pearson: ORCID iD orcid.org/0000-0001-7089-6103
ORCID for Sophie Hodgetts: ORCID iD orcid.org/0000-0002-8579-5804

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