A pilot qualitative study of dementia perceptions and experiences of Nigerian migrant caregivers

Nwasaki, Candidus, Hayes, Catherine, Roberts, Amy and Fulton, John (2019) A pilot qualitative study of dementia perceptions and experiences of Nigerian migrant caregivers. International Journal of Africa Nursing Sciences, 10. pp. 167-174. ISSN 2214-1391

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Abstract

Introduction

Concomitant with the rate at which the United Kingdom’s population is aging, the increased number of older adults with dementia, and the decrease in relatives who are available to care for these older adults, there has been an exponential rise in the need for healthcare assistants in the workforce. Since the workforce now comprises of a significant number of migrant healthcare workers, some of whom originate from developing countries like Nigeria, it is important to understand some sociocultural factors that may influence the quality of caregiving provided for older adults with dementia in the United Kingdom.
Objective

To gain an in-depth understanding of dementia perceptions and experiences of Nigerian migrant formal dementia caregivers.
Setting

North East England.
Participants

Six Nigerian migrant healthcare workers employed in long-term care facilities (e.g., nursing homes) that have older adults with dementia.
Methods

Qualitative descriptive method embedded in symbolic interactionism, following a purposive sampling technique and recruitment to the study was used. Semi-structured interviews and thematic analysis were conducted for data collection and analysis respectively.
Results

Cultural specificity, dementia awareness, and empathic witnessing were identified as the three major themes in the findings. The findings suggest that meanings given to dementia symptoms are influenced by sociocultural factors and they may ultimately affect the way people with dementia are cared for.
Discussion

Minimal knowledge about dementia consequently results in minimal appreciation or regard for the seriousness and importance of dementia. When people from communities with different meanings of dementia and little knowledge of the condition become caregivers in developed countries, there may potentially be new psychological burdens that originate from the differing contextual significance of dementia and caregiving for persons with dementia.

Item Type: Article
Subjects: Sciences > Health Sciences
Sciences > Nursing
Divisions: Faculty of Health Sciences and Wellbeing
Faculty of Health Sciences and Wellbeing > School of Nursing and Health Sciences
Depositing User: Catherine Hayes
Date Deposited: 08 May 2019 11:15
Last Modified: 04 Feb 2020 16:09
URI: http://sure.sunderland.ac.uk/id/eprint/10610

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